Why Doesn’t It Get Dark When You Blink?

The literary convention that numbers less than 10 should be given in words is often highly unsuitable in mathematics… The excessive use of the word forms is regrettably spreading at the present time. ~ J.E. Littlewood 1885 – 1977 - Mathematician

Chemistry begins in the stars. The stars are the source of the chemical elements which are the building blocks of matter and the core of our subject. ~ Peter Atkins - 1940 to present


Why Doesn't It Get Dark When You Blink?

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List of inventors!
List of inventors!

David Chaum (born 1955) USA – a.o. Digital signatures ecash.

John Vincent Atanasoff (1903–1995) Bulgaria/USA – modern digital computer.

Ivan Knunyants (1906–1990) Armenia/Russia – capron Nylon 6 polyamide-6.

Leonty Shamshurenkov (1687–1758) Russia – first self-propelling carriage (a precursor to both bicycle and automobile) projects of an original odometer and self-propelling sledge.

Leó Szilárd (1898–1964) Hungary/USA – Co-developed the atomic bomb patented the nuclear reactor catalyst of the Manhattan Project.

Robert Goddard (1882–1945) USA – liquid fuel rocket.

Yefim Smolin Russia – table-glass (stakan granyonyi).

Emil Strub (1858–1909) Switzerland – Strub rack railway system.

Tanaka Hisashige (1799–1881) Japan – Myriad year clock.

John Stringfellow (1799–1883) UK – aerial steam carriage.

Robert Cailliau (born 1947) Belgium – with Tim Berners-Lee the World Wide Web.

Vladimir Baranov-Rossine (1888–1944) Ukraine/Russia/France – Optophonic Piano pointillist or dynamic military camouflage.

Charlie Booth (1903–2008) Australia – Starting blocks.

Boris Borisovich Galitzine (1862–1916) Russia – electromagnetic seismograph.

Gail Borden (1801–1874) USA – a.o. Condensed milk produced by vacuum.

Joseph-Armand Bombardier (1907–1964) Canada – snowmobile.

Antonio Meucci (1808–1889) Italy/USA– a.o. various early telephones a hygrometer a milk test.

Yi Xing (683–727) China – astronomical clock.

Genrich Altshuller (1926–1998) Russia – TRIZ ("The Theory of Solving Inventor's Problems").

Nicholas McKay Sr. (1920–2014) USA – Lint roller.


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Brilliant Quotes By Famous And Awesome Scientists!

Nearly 2.5 billion years of prokaryotic cells and nothing else – two-thirds of life’s history in stasis at the lowest level of recorded complexity… Why did life remain at stage 1 for two-thirds of its history if complexity offers such benefits? ~ Stephen Jay Gould 1941 to 2002 - Paleontologist

What is possible in the Cavendish Laboratory may not be too difficult in the sun. - Sir Arthur Eddington 1882 to 1944 Astronomer Physicist Mathematician

Archimedes’ finding that the crown was of gold was a discovery; but he invented the method of determining the density of solids. Indeed discoverers must generally be inventors; though inventors are not necessarily discoverers. - William Ramsay 1852 to 1916 Chemist

The invention of logarithms came to the world as a bolt from the blue. No previous work had led up to it… It stands isolated breaking in upon human thought abruptly without borrowing from the work of other intellects or following known lines of mathematical thought. ~ John Moulton 1844 – 1921 - Mathematician

I see some parallels between the shifts of fashion in mathematics and in music. In music the popular new styles of jazz and rock became fashionable a little earlier than the new mathematical styles of chaos and complexity theory. Jazz and rock were long despised by classical musicians but have emerged as art-forms more accessible than classical music to a wide section of the public. Jazz and rock are no longer to be despised as passing fads. Neither are chaos and complexity theory. But still classical music and classical mathematics are not dead. Mozart lives and so does Euler. When the wheel of fashion turns once more quantum mechanics and hard analysis will once again be in style. ~ Freeman Dyson b. 1923 - Mathematician and Physicist

Pure mathematics exist by themselves; no will produces them no power can limit them. They are eternal laws that no man can infringe and from which it is impossible to escape. ~ S. Sandaram Iyer 1883 - Philosopher

But though the professed aim of all scientific work is to unravel the secrets of nature it has another effect not less valuable on the mind of the worker. It leaves him in possession of methods which nothing but scientific work could have led him to invent. ~ James Clerk Maxwell 1831 to 1879


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