Why do we ride horses but not zebras?

Pierre Curie voluntarily exposed his arm to the action of radium for several hours. This resulted in damage resembling a burn that developed progressively and required several months to heal. Henri Becquerel had by accident a similar burn as a result of carrying in his vest pocket a glass tube containing radium salt. He came to tell us of this evil effect of radium exclaiming in a manner at once delighted and annoyed: “I love it but I owe it a grudge.” - Marie Curie 1867 to 1934 Chemist Physicist

In practical applications we are concerned only with comparatively small numbers; only stellar astronomy and atomic physics deal with ‘large’ numbers and they have very little more practical importance as yet than the most abstract pure mathematics. ~ G. H. Hardy 1877 – 1947 - Mathematician


Why do we ride horses but not zebras?

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List of inventors!
List of inventors!

Satyendra Nath Bose (1894–1974) India – work on gas-like properties of electromagnetic radiation Boson and providing foundation for Bose–Einstein statistics and Bose–Einstein condensate.

Robert Watson-Watt (1892–1973) Scotland – microwave radar.

Samuel Morey (1762–1843) USA – internal combustion engine.

John Pemberton (1831–1888) USA – Coca-Cola.

Shen Kuo (1031–1095) China – improved gnomon armillary sphere clepsydra and sighting tube.

John Wesley Hyatt (1837–1920) USA – celluloid manufacturing..

Charles Hall (1863–1914) USA – aluminum production.

Charles Macintosh (1766–1843) Scotland – waterproof raincoat life vest.

Boris Rosing (1869–1933) Russia – CRT television (first television system using CRT on the receiving side).

Pieter van Musschenbroek (1692–1761) Netherlands – Leyden jar pyrometer.

Louis Braille (1809–1852) France – Braille writing system Braille musical notation.

Humberto Fernández Morán (1924–1999) Venezuela – Diamond scalpel Ultra microtome.

Marin Soljačić (1974) Croatia - Resonant inductive coupling.

Arkhip Lyulka (1908–1984) Russia – first double jet turbofan engine other Soviet aircraft engines.

Gary Starkweather (born 1938) USA – laser printer color management.

John Roebuck (1718–1794) UK – lead chamber process for sulfuric acid synthesis.

Heike Kamerlingh Onnes (1853–1926) Netherlands – liquid helium.

Genrich Altshuller (1926–1998) Russia – TRIZ ("The Theory of Solving Inventor's Problems").

Slavoljub Eduard Penkala (1871–1922) Croatia – mechanical pencil.

J. Stuart Blackton (1875–1941) USA – stop-motion film.


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Brilliant Quotes By Famous And Awesome Scientists!

Physics is very muddled again at the moment; it is much too hard for me anyway and I wish I were a movie comedian or something like that and had never heard anything about physics! ~ Wolfgang Pauli 1900 – 1958

Progress is made by trial and failure; the failures are generally a hundred times more numerous than the successes ; yet they are usually left unchronicled. - William Ramsay 1852 to 1916 Chemist

We cannot define anything precisely! If we attempt to we get into that paralysis of thought that comes to philosophers who sit opposite each other one saying to the other ‘You don’t know what you are talking about!’ The second one says ‘What do you mean by know? What do you mean by talking? What do you mean by you?’ and so on. ~ Richard Feynman 1918 to 1988

Benjamin Franklin performed a beautiful experiment using surfactants; on a pond at Clapham Common he poured a small amount of oleic acid a natural surfactant which tends to form a dense film at the water-air interface. He measured the volume required to cover all the pond. Knowing the area he then knew the height of the film something like three nanometers in our current units. ~ Pierre-Gilles de Gennes 1932 to 2007

Nearly 2.5 billion years of prokaryotic cells and nothing else – two-thirds of life’s history in stasis at the lowest level of recorded complexity… Why did life remain at stage 1 for two-thirds of its history if complexity offers such benefits? ~ Stephen Jay Gould 1941 to 2002 - Paleontologist

Division is esteemed one of the busiest operations of Arithmetic and such as requireth a mind not wandering or settled upon other matters. ~ Thomas Hylles The arte of vulgar arithmeticke 1600 - Mathematician

Experimental science hardly ever affords us more than approximations to the truth; and whenever many agents are concerned we are in great danger of being mistaken. ~ Humphry Davy - 1778 to 1829


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