Why Do We Get Freckles?

Primates are visual animals above all and anatomical work in particular is as much pictorial as verbal. ~ Stephen Jay Gould 1941 to 2002 - Paleontologist

We were a polite society and I expected to lead a quiet life teaching mechanics and listening to my senior colleagues gently but obliquely poking fun at one another. This dream of somnolent peace vanished very quickly when (Ernest) Rutherford came to Cambridge. Rutherford was the only person I have met who immediately impressed me as a great man. He was a big man and made a big noise and he seemed to enjoy every minute of his life. I remember that when transatlantic broadcasting first came in Rutherford told us at a dinner in Hall how he had spoken into a microphone to America and had been heard all over the continent. One of the bolder of our Fellows said: “Surely you did not need to use apparatus for that.” ~ Geoffrey Fellows 1871 to 1937


Why Do We Get Freckles?

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List of inventors!
List of inventors!

Pavel Sukhoi (1895–1975) Russia – Su-series fighter aircraft.

John Bardeen (1908–1991) USA – co-inventor of the transistor.

Philip M. Parker (born 1960) USA – computer automated book authoring.

Alexander Chizhevsky (1897–1964) Russia – air ionizer.

John "Jack" Higson Cover Jr. (1920–2009) USA – Taser.

Vladimir Baranov-Rossine (1888–1944) Ukraine/Russia/France – Optophonic Piano pointillist or dynamic military camouflage.

William Crookes (1832–1919) UK – Crookes radiometer Crookes tube.

Raymond Kurzweil (born 1948) Optical character recognition; flatbed scanner.

Les Paul (1915–2009) USA – multitrack recording.

Lucio Bini (1908–1964) together with Ugo Cerletti (1877–1963) Italy – Electroconvulsive therapy.

Frederick Walton (c. 1834–1928) UK – Linoleum.

Franz Joseph Emil Fischer (1877–1947) together with Hans Tropsch (1889–1935) Germany – Fischer–Tropsch process (refinery process).

Joseph Shivers (1920-2014) USA – Spandex.

Cornelius Drebbel (1572–1633) The Netherlands – first navigable submarine.

Alexander Lodygin (1847–1923) Russia – electrical filament incandescent light bulb with tungsten filament.

Dennis Ritchie (1941–2011) USA – C (programming language).

John J. Mooney (born c. 1928) together with Carl D. Keith (1920–2008) USA – three way catalytic converter.

Konstantin Khrenov (1894–1984) Russia – underwater welding.

Herman Hollerith (1860–1929) USA – recording data on a machine readable medium tabulator punched cards.

Sharaf al-Dīn al-Tūsī (1135–1213) Persia/Iran – linear astrolabe.


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Brilliant Quotes By Famous And Awesome Scientists!

Chemistry begins in the stars. The stars are the source of the chemical elements which are the building blocks of matter and the core of our subject. ~ Peter Atkins - 1940 to present

Division is esteemed one of the busiest operations of Arithmetic and such as requireth a mind not wandering or settled upon other matters. ~ Thomas Hylles The arte of vulgar arithmeticke 1600 - Mathematician

Time is the best appraiser of scientific work and I am aware that an industrial discovery rarely produces all its fruit in the hands of its first inventor. ~ Louis Pasteur - 1822 to 1895

In our work we are always between Scylla and Charybdis; we may fail to abstract enough and miss important physics or we may abstract too much and end up with fictitious objects in our models turning into real monsters that devour us. ~ Murray Gell-Mann b. 1929

Although the alternate ‘wax and wane’ cycles are the rule rather than the exception in all fields of human endeavor in that of biological sciences the ‘wane’ is all too often indicative of a justified loss of faith in the rational and methodical approach that had at first raised so much hope. ~ Rita Levi-Montalcini 1909 to 2012 Neurobiologist

I saw that people trying to synthesize gold and silver were working in ignorance and by false methods; I then perceived that they belonged to two classes the dupers and the duped. I pitied both of them. ~ Geber c. 712 – c. 815 AD

A detective with his murder mystery a chemist seeking the structure of a new compound use little of the formal and logical modes of reasoning. Through a series of intuitions surmises fancies they stumble upon the right explanation and have a knack of seizing it when it once comes within reach. ~ Gilbert Lewis 1875 – 1946


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