Why Can’t We Make a Good Salt Substitute?

We were a polite society and I expected to lead a quiet life teaching mechanics and listening to my senior colleagues gently but obliquely poking fun at one another. This dream of somnolent peace vanished very quickly when (Ernest) Rutherford came to Cambridge. Rutherford was the only person I have met who immediately impressed me as a great man. He was a big man and made a big noise and he seemed to enjoy every minute of his life. I remember that when transatlantic broadcasting first came in Rutherford told us at a dinner in Hall how he had spoken into a microphone to America and had been heard all over the continent. One of the bolder of our Fellows said: “Surely you did not need to use apparatus for that.” ~ Geoffrey Fellows 1871 to 1937

Actually everything that can be known has a number; for it is impossible to grasp anything with the mind or to recognize it without this. ~ Philolaus c. 470 – c. 385 BC - Scientist and Philosopher


Why Can't We Make a Good Salt Substitute?

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List of inventors!
List of inventors!

Clarence Birdseye (1886–1956) USA – frozen food process.

Ibn Sina (Avicenna) (973–1037) Persia/Iran – steam distillation essential oil pharmacopoeia clinical pharmacology clinical trial randomized controlled trial quarantine cancer surgery cancer therapy pharmacotherapy phytotherapy Hindiba Taxus baccata L calcium channel blocker.

Cyril Duquet (1841–1922) Canada – Telephone handset.

Henry Burden (1791–1871) Scotland and USA – Horseshoe machine first usable iron railed road spike.

Victor Hasselblad (1906–1978) Sweden – invented the 6 x 6 cm single-lens reflex camera.

Federico Faggin (born 1941) Italy – microprocessor.

Léon Theremin (1896–1993) Russia – theremin interlace burglar alarm terpsitone Rhythmicon (first drum machine) The Thing (listening device).

Nikola Tesla (1856–1943) Croatia/Serbia – induction motor high-voltage / high-frequency power experiments the transmission of electrical power.

Michael Smith (1932–2000) USA – Site-directed mutagenesis (molecular biology).

Tivadar Puskas (1844–1893) Hungary – telephone exchange.

Johann Maria Farina (1685–1766) Germany; Eau de Cologne.

Earl W. Bascom (1906–1995) Canada/USA – side-delivery rodeo chute hornless rodeo saddle rodeo bareback rigging rodeo chaps.

Gregory Goodwin Pincus (1903–1967) together with Min Chueh Chang (1908–1991) USA/China – Combined oral contraceptive pill.

Vint Cerf (born 1943) together with Bob Kahn (1938–) USA – Internet Protocol (IP).

Ray Dolby (1933–2013) USA – Dolby noise-reduction system.

Shintaro Uda (1869–1976) together with Hidetsugu Yagi (1886–1976) Japan – Yagi-Uda antenna.

Chester Greenwood (1858–1937) USA – thermal earmuffs.

Igor Tamm (1895–1971) Russia – co-developer of tokamak.

Henry Perky (1843–1906) USA – shredded wheat.

Charles Xavier Thomas de Colmar (1785–1870) France – Arithmometer.


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Brilliant Quotes By Famous And Awesome Scientists!

Instead of being the biological center of the Universe I believe our planet is just an assembly station but one with a major advantage over most other places. The constant presence of liquid water almost everywhere on the Earth is a huge advantage for life especially for assembling life into complex forms by the process we call ‘evolution.’ ~ Fred Hoyle 1915 to 2001 - Astrophysicist

The finding of the double helix thus brought us not only joy but great relief. It was unbelievably interesting and immediately allowed us to make a serious proposal for the mechanism of gene duplication. ~ James Watson 1928 – Present - Geneticist

But though the professed aim of all scientific work is to unravel the secrets of nature it has another effect not less valuable on the mind of the worker. It leaves him in possession of methods which nothing but scientific work could have led him to invent. ~ James Clerk Maxwell 1831 to 1879

The development of biology is going to destroy to some extent our traditional grounds for ethical belief and it is not easy to see what to put in their place. ~ Francis Crick 1916 – 2004 Molecular Biologist

This is an era of specialists each of whom sees his own problem and is unaware of or intolerant of the larger frame into which it fits. ~ Rachel Carson 1907 to 1964 - Marine Biologist

Did the genome of our cave-dwelling predecessors contain a set or sets of genes which enable modern man to compose music of infinite complexity and write novels with profound meaning? …It looks as though the early Homo was already provided with the intellectual potential which was in great excess of what was needed to cope with the environment of his time.” - Susumu Ohno 1928 to 2000 Geneticist

Nearly 2.5 billion years of prokaryotic cells and nothing else – two-thirds of life’s history in stasis at the lowest level of recorded complexity… Why did life remain at stage 1 for two-thirds of its history if complexity offers such benefits? ~ Stephen Jay Gould 1941 to 2002 - Paleontologist


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