What’s the Hottest Chemical in the World?

Time is the best appraiser of scientific work and I am aware that an industrial discovery rarely produces all its fruit in the hands of its first inventor. ~ Louis Pasteur - 1822 to 1895

Everything that human beings or living animals do is done by protein molecules. And therefore the kind of proteins that one has and therefore the ability one has is determined by the genes that one has. ~ Har Gobind Khorana 1922 – 2011 - Molecular Biologist


What's the Hottest Chemical in the World?

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List of inventors!
List of inventors!

Narcis Monturiol i Estarriol (1819–1885) Spain – steam powered submarine.

James Hargreaves (1720–1778) UK – spinning jenny.

Frederick Sanger (1918–2013) USA – Sanger sequencing (= DNA sequencing).

Charles Simonyi (born 1948) Hungary – Hungarian notation.

Victor Hasselblad (1906–1978) Sweden – invented the 6 x 6 cm single-lens reflex camera.

Mary Anderson (1866–1953) United States – windshield wiper blade.

Andrey Chokhov (c. 1545–1629) Russia – Tsar Cannon.

Jozef Karol Hell (1713–1789) Slovakia – the water pillar.

Christiaan Huygens (1629–1695) Netherlands – pendulum clock.

Michael I. Pupin (1858–1935) Serbia – pupinization (loading coils) tunable oscillator.

Tullio Campagnolo (1901–1983) Italy – Quick release skewer.

Hovannes Adamian (1879–1932) Armenia/Russia – tricolor principle of the color television.

Semen Korsakov (1787–1853) Russia – punched card for information storage.

Hippolyte Pixii (1808–1835) France – Pixii dynamo.

Arkhip Lyulka (1908–1984) Russia – first double jet turbofan engine other Soviet aircraft engines.

Dmitri Dmitrievich Maksutov (1896–1964) Russia – Maksutov telescope.

Ed Seymour (inv. c. 1949) USA – Aerosol paint.

Arthur Fry (born 1931) USA – Post-it note.

Rowland Hill (1795–1879) UK – postage stamp.

James Leonard Plimpton (1828–1911) USA – roller skates.


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Brilliant Quotes By Famous And Awesome Scientists!

Why the dinosaurs died out is not known but it is supposed to be because they had minute brains and devoted themselves to the growth of weapons of offense in the shape of numerous horns. ~ Bertrand Russell 1872 – 1970 - Mathematician and Philosopher

When you hear a physicist invoke the uncertainty principle keep a hand on your wallet. ~ David Griffiths b. 1942

Euclid’s work ought to have been any educationist’s nightmare… it never offers any “motivations ” it has no illuminating “asides ” it does not attempt to make anything “intuitive ” and it avoids “applications” to a fault. It is so “humorless” in its mathematical purism that… …it should have been spurned by students and “progressive” teachers in every generation. But it nevertheless survived intact all the turmoils ravages and illiteracies of the dissolving Roman Empire of the early Dark Ages of the Crusades and of the plagues and famines of the later Middle Ages. ~ Salomon Bochner 1899 – 1982 - Mathematician

Science is the acceptance of what works and the rejection of what does not. That needs more courage than we might think. - Jacob Bronowski 1908 to 1974 Mathematician Biologist

Trial by combat of wits in disputations has no attraction for the seeker after truth; to him the appeal to experiment is the last and only test of the merit of an opinion conjecture or hypotheses. ~ Joseph Mellor - 1869 to 1938

Progress is made by trial and failure; the failures are generally a hundred times more numerous than the successes ; yet they are usually left unchronicled. - William Ramsay 1852 to 1916 Chemist

We were a polite society and I expected to lead a quiet life teaching mechanics and listening to my senior colleagues gently but obliquely poking fun at one another. This dream of somnolent peace vanished very quickly when (Ernest) Rutherford came to Cambridge. Rutherford was the only person I have met who immediately impressed me as a great man. He was a big man and made a big noise and he seemed to enjoy every minute of his life. I remember that when transatlantic broadcasting first came in Rutherford told us at a dinner in Hall how he had spoken into a microphone to America and had been heard all over the continent. One of the bolder of our Fellows said: “Surely you did not need to use apparatus for that.” ~ Geoffrey Fellows 1871 to 1937


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